Moving the source code

Today Geir Ove and I had our first meeting today where we decided how to approach the uploading of the code and how to organize the source code in the new project. So new code should start to appear in Google Code pretty soon. (I’ll post when it does.)

However, a major part of this work is deciding what will not go up, because over the past decade we have accumulated mountains of cruft. We are making use of this move to throw away lots of stuff that is not needed, and which we will be better off without.

This is the lines of code count on the old source tree:

http://cloc.sourceforge.net v 1.07  T=144.0 s (30.0 files/s, 3714.8 lines/s)
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Language          files     blank   comment      code    scale   3rd gen. equiv
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Java               2438     61492     54827    214443 x   1.36 =      291642.48
XML                 393      4506      6238     57678 x   1.90 =      109588.20
JSP                 809      6231      3181     38039 x   1.48 =       56297.72
Python              181      7785      4619     26197 x   4.20 =      110027.40
HTML                319      2011       358     25274 x   1.90 =       48020.60
CSS                  53      1707       463      6981 x   1.00 =        6981.00
C#                    5       685       568      3095 x   1.36 =        4209.20
Javascript           21       325       361      2610 x   1.48 =        3862.80
DTD                  14       379       450      1143 x   1.90 =        2171.70
DOS Batch            22       113       195       697 x   0.63 =         439.11
Bourne Shell         21       114       170       632 x   3.81 =        2407.92
SQL                   7       145        80       531 x   2.29 =        1215.99
make                 27        92        56       150 x   2.50 =         375.00
Lisp                  2        47        88        84 x   1.25 =         105.00
XSLT                  1        12         1        33 x   1.90 =          62.70
ASP.Net               4         8         4        27 x   1.29 =          34.83
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SUM:               4317     85652     71659    377614 x   1.69 =      637441.65
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

One surprise here is the C# code. We have a Topic Maps engine written in C# by Graham Moore, that he brought with him when he joined Ontopia back in 2003. It doesn’t belong in the Ontopia project, so if anyone wants it, please let us know, and we’ll give it to you for nothing.

We also have some old Python code, as you can see, including the tmproc Topic Maps engine, an early tolog implementation based on it, plus the old Autogen framework. If anyone wants any of these, please let us know.

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6 thoughts on “Moving the source code”

  1. What does the “3rd gen. equiv” and “scale” columns mean? I would guess that scale somehow approximates the productivity of the language; i.e. how much more code one would have to code in a 1st gen language, but I really can’t understand how you come up with those figures …

    1. I’ll be honest with you: I have absolutely no idea. Like you, I think that the scale is meant to be an approximation of how much you’d have to write in a “1st-generation” language to achieve the same, but, frankly, I think those numbers are bogus.

      So, I think we should focus on how many lines we have actually written, and just ignore the rest of the figures. (This is just the output of cloc as produced, with no changes whatsoever made.)

  2. The site came up when we were searching for resources on Topic map in C# Could you please share with the code. We would like to take a look at it.

    Thanks in advance.
    Sriram

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